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Number of items: 61.

"No History, Only Biography": Recreating the Past through Biographies of People, Places and Things. Professor Barbara Yorke.
Professor Barbara Yorke discussed new developments in biography writing at the 2013 University of Southampton Reuter Lecture. She reflected on the recent renewal of popularity of biographies and talked about the challenges of researching and writing about people from earlier centuries. The Professor Emerita of Early Medieval History, University of Winchester and Honorary Professor, Institute of Archaeology, University of London also held a biography master class with postgraduate research students before the talk. The lecture is held each year in memory of Tim Reuter, formerly Professor of Medieval History at Southampton. His conference in 1999 to mark the 11th centenary of King Alfred’s death was one of his last academic activities. Before the lecture, copies of Professor Reuter's monumental last book, Das Briefbuch Abt Wibalds von Stablo und Corvey, completed by Dr Hartman from Munich, were presented to Professor Chris Woolgar, who represented the University of Southampton library.

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A Fabulous Opportunity. Postgraduate study in English
Learn more about Postgraduate research opportunities in English, and the research culture at Southampton.

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A practice-led Music research project
George Holloway talks about his experience of a practice-led research project; of a Music programme in composition, that included an opportunity to study overseas at the National Taiwan University.

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A sixteenth century music manuscript
Mike Gale talks about his research project exploring a sixteenth century music manuscript; and the research culture at Southampton, that included organising a two day cross-disciplinary conference on sixteenth and seventeenth century English manuscripts.

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Beethoven, Bayreuth and the Origins of the Federal Republic of Germany
Sixty years ago, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was played at the first Bayreuth Festival to be staged after the Second World War. Did it symbolise European unity or something darker? Professor Neil Gregor has been investigating its meaning as part of his research into post war Germany.

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Celebrating the life of eighteenth century writer Sarah Fielding
As part of the Chawton House Library Seminar Series; the three hundredth birthday of the novelist Sarah Fielding (sister of the more famous Henry) was marked at Chawton House, with a talk by Professor Isobel Grundy of the University of Alberta, Canada.

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Conserving the Wellington Archives
This short video introduces the Wellington Archives, and the on-going conservation project to preserve this unique collection. The papers of Arthur Wellesley, first Duke of Wellington (1769-1852) are one of the most prestigious collections of primary documents relating to British history in the first half of the nineteenth century. They are the Duke’s principal archive and cover his military and political career from 1790 until his death.

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Crossing Boarders. East Asian cinema explored
Recorded in 2008, Film Studies research students present a symposium on East Asian cinema, the first of its kind; the symposium included a live video link with the University of Hong Kong.

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Discovering Portus
Find out how University of Southampton archaeologists discovered one of the most important locations in the Roman world.

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Dr Bharat Tandon’s talk: I do not write for such dull Elves: Finding Voices in Pride and Prejudice
Four scholars of Austen discussed her best-loved novel, with a variety of talks focusing on her style, on reception and legacy, on her life and times, and on 20th and 21st century adaptations. Dr Shelley Cobb, Lecturer of English and Film at the University of Southampton, spoke about how Pride and Prejudice had been portrayed on film and TV, from conventional treatments to the adoption of its themes in Bridget Jones Diary; her talk included amusing and illuminating video clips. The day was organised by Dr Gillian Dow, Director of Research at Chawton House Library and Southampton lecturer. It ended at Jane Austen's House Museum, with a selection of readings from the novel by Elizabeth Garvie, the actress who played Elizabeth Bennet in the 1980 BBC production of Pride and Prejudice. Dr Bharat Tandon from the University of East Anglia, is the author of Jane Austen and the Morality of Conversation (2003) and a judge for the 2012 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. He was one of the speakers at the study day. Listen to his talk: I do not write for such dull Elves: Finding Voices in Pride and Prejudice.

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Eighteenth century women writers
As part of the Chawton House Library Seminar Series; Dr Gillian Dow discusses Chawton House Library; and the eighteenth century women writers connected to the library

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Genia Schoenbaumsfeld - Philosophy and the Unconscious
Philosophy talk given at Southampton City Art Gallery

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Honarary degree awarded to Professor Barry Cunliffe
Professor Barry Cunliffe talks about his passion for Archaeology, following his honorary doctorate award in July 2009.

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Honorary degree awarded to BBC correspondent Caroline Wyatt
Southampton Languages graduate and the BBC's defence correspondent, Caroline Wyatt, accepts an honorary degree.

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Honours for leading art historian Stephen Deuchar
History graduate Stephen Deuchar accepts the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters.

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Jewish life before and after the Holocaust
The Parkes Institute for the study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations, hosted a unique all-day event focusing on Jewish Life before and after the Holocaust.

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Looking Forward to looking back. Archaeologists uncovered
Recorded in 2009, archaeology graduates talk about their experience of studying on the undergraduate programme at Southampton, a leading centre for the study of archaeology.

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Male and female novels: gendered fictions and the reading public
As part of the Chawton House Library Seminar Series; Professor Barbara Benedict of Trinity College, Connecticut, USA, discusses fiction and gender; she asks whether novels 'by a Lady' differ from those which are not; and how the gender of readers shapes the reception of novels.

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Multidisciplinary research at Humanities. Contemporary German Jewish literature as a counter discourse
Find out more about the multidisciplinary research opportunities, and world renowned archive resources of the Parkes Institute and the learning culture at Humanities. Bettina Codrai gives insight into her research project, combining the subject areas of Jewish Studies, Languages and History that explores the wider question of contemporary German Jewish literature as a counter discourse and the link between identity and social change amongst the minority, and how this has impacted on German Jewish identity in the 21st Century.

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My Best Burn. Interview with Dr Phil Harding
Dr Phil Harding is interviewed, following his honary doctorate on 24th July 2008.

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Philosophy Cafe podcast: Are people always selfish?
The latest in the popular Philosophy cafe series at the John Hansard Gallery saw Dr Alex Gregory talking about self interest. Alex researches the relationship between what we want and what we think is good, and has published on these issues. "It's clear that people sometimes do things for their own benefit: you might push ahead of other people to ensure you get a good seat on the train. Some philosophers have made the bolder claim that we always act out of self-interest. But is that true? What are the arguments for it? It might seem obvious that sometimes people act for the sake of others: for example, someone might offer to donate blood for the benefit of a complete stranger. But can such examples be explained away as ultimately self-interested?".

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Philosophy Café – How much must we give to famine relief?
Every day many people die from lack of food. It is in our power to prevent a large number of these deaths. Philosophers such as Peter Singer and Peter Unger have argued that, given these facts, a typical member of an affluent country is morally required to give away most of their assets to famine relief. But does morality really demand that we sacrifice so much to save the lives of strangers? Philosophy Cafe talks are scheduled each month and cover a wide range of topics, for more information on future Philosophy Cafes please visit the Philosophy website.

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Philosophy Café – Is it rational to be moral? By Dr Jonathan Way.
The University of Southampton’s popular Philosophy Cafe series has considered the differences between rationality and morality. Dr Jonathan Way has argued that we ordinarily assume that it is rational to be moral - that we are not foolish for doing what's right. However, on reflection it can be hard to see why this is so. After all, it certainly seems as if there can be occasions on which immorality pays. Nor is it obvious that immorality must involve any kind of inconsistency or confusion. His talk explored these challenges and considered how some philosophers have tried to vindicate the rationality of morality. For further information on the University of Southampton’s Philosophy Café’s visit http://www.southampton.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/philosophy/public_events/cafe.page?

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Philosophy Café – New ways of looking at mathematics by Prof Ray Monk.
Ray Monk, Professor of Philosophy, has spoken about mathematical truth at the University of Southampton’s popular Philosophy Cafe at the John Hansard Gallery on campus. From the time of Plato onwards, philosophers have regarded mathematical truth as an ideal. Unlike ordinary, empirical truth, it is held, mathematical truth is eternal, incorrigible and certain. This talk looked at the ways in which philosophers have tried to account for the special nature of mathematical truth, concentrating on Bertrand Russell who ended up denying there was such a thing. Ray, the author of biographies of Wittgenstein and Russell, wrote a well-received book about atomic scientist J Robert Oppenheimer in 2012. Philosophy Cafe talks are scheduled each month and cover a wide range of topics.

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Philosophy Café – What am I? by Dr Conor McHugh
Lecturer Dr Conor McHugh challenged the audience at the University of Southampton Philosophy Cafe to consider what makes a person. He asked them to ponder what would happen if scientists swapped individual’s brains from one person to another: “Which, if either, of the resulting people is you? What if the scientists erase all of my memories and scan them into your brain? In that case, it will seem to you that it was you who, for example, wrote these words. Is this impression illusory?” Conor’s lively session, encouraging people to think about such questions, was aimed at helping us to get clearer on personal identity and on our concern for our own futures.

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Philosophy Café. Jonathan Way - Ethics Without Principles?
Our highly successful Philosophy Café (run in conjunction with the John Hansard Gallery) is now entering its fifth year: the Café offers regular, informal lunchtime discussions that are free and accessible. These regular, informal lunchtime discussions are held between 1-2pm and open to all (no booking required). They aim to bring together those with an interest in philosophy - from both within the University and the wider local community.

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Philosophy Café. Lee Walters - Is Time Travel Possible?
These regular, informal lunchtime discussions are held between 1-2pm and open to all (no booking required). They aim to bring together those with an interest in philosophy - from both within the University and the wider local community.

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Philosophy of Religion. Is religious faith irrational?
Dr Genia Schonbaumsfeld discusses religious faith, and what it means to argue for and against the existence of God; of an experience of faith beyond the evidence of natural science, in a talk held as part of the John Hansard Gallery, Philosophy Café series.

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Philosophy of Sex. Does monogamy make sense?
Dr Fiona Wollard asks whether monogamy makes sense; in a talk held as part of the John Hansard Gallery, Philosophy Café series.

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Piecing together the development of the Portus excavation
Learn more about the excavation of Portus, the Imperial Port of Rome.

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Pride, Prejudice, Patriarchy: Jane Austen reads Mary Hays
As part of the Chawton House Library Seminar Series; Gina Luria Walker, Professor of Women's Studies at the New School in New York, discusses the link between Austen and Hays, and asks if there are convergences between the two writers.

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Professor Michael Kelly on the English baccalaureate
Professor Michael Kelly discusses the challenges of modern languages in English state schools.

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Professor Neil Gregor’s Inaugural Lecture “In memoriam: Richard Strauss and the Legacies of War”
What do people hear in music? How might that change over time? Why should that be of interest to historians? This lecture explores such questions by asking how Germans listened to Richard Strauss' work after 1945. In doing so it seeks to engage from a historian's perspective in and with the new cultural history of music, a field which has hitherto been pioneered mainly from within the institutional and disciplinary frameworks of musicology rather than history. Its wider argument pleads less for dialogue across a particular interdisciplinary interface than for a greater focus on those problem spaces which lie between literatures of common interest across the Humanities and beyond - in this case literatures on the senses, on the emotions and on memory. At its centre, however, is an attempt to open up new perspectives on an overtly historical subject: the visceral legacies of the Second World War.

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Routes into Languages: Able Linguist Day 2009
Organised by the Routes into Languages initiative for secondary schools, find out what the University of Southampton offers in Modern Languages study.

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Score in French 2010
Score in French is a languages programme devised by Dr Ian McCall as part of the Routes into Languages initiative, and in collaboration with Southampton football club, to motivate secondary school pupils to get involved with languages.

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Sexual Violence in Medieval Warfare
Professor Anne Curry talks about sexual violence in Medieval warfare; historic perspectives through the centuries and their lessons for today.

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Sir Arnold Wesker - The Birth of a Play: How and why I wrote Shylock
Recorded in October 2007, and the 17th Parkes Lecture: playwrite Sir Arnold Wesker talks about the genesis, themes and reception of his play, Shylock. Set in the Jewish ghettos of 16th century Venice, Shylock is based on the same three stories Shakespeare wove together to create the Merchant of Venice.

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Surveying the medieval landscape at Scotney Castle
Archaeology students learn how to read the landscape on a survey field visit to the 14th-century moated castle at Scotney in Kent.

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Sympathy with Strange Creatures: Rana Dasgupta
Author Rana Dasgupta presents a seminar on migration and writing; and reads extracts from his novel: Tokyo Cancelled.

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TAG30 – Meeting of the Theoretical Archaeology Group
Recorded in December 2008, contributors to TAG30 are invited to give insight into the medieval history of Southampton.

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TNMundi: Music and Migration
The TNMundi project explores what it means to be a musician who lives and works in transnational networks.

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And 1 more...
Teaching Shakespeare in the classroom
As part of a Humanities initiative, Professor Ros King and Patrick Sandford, Artistic Director of the Nuffield Theatre, have been developing new approaches to teaching Shakespeare in the classroom, through innovative workshop sessions held for teachers at the Nuffield Theatre, based at the University campus.

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The 'fictions' about fiction and gender during the eighteenth century
As part of the Chawton House Library Seminar Series; Professor Barbara Benedict of Trinity College, Connecticut, USA, is interviewed on the gender about novels from 1770 - 1830.

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The Broadlands Archives
For more than 20 years, the University of Southampton Library has held in its Special Collections Division the Broadlands Archives. The archive contains some 4,500 boxes, dating from the sixteenth century to the present, centred on the Temple (Palmerston), Ashley, Cassel and Mountbatten families.

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The Sociolinguistics Symposium 18: SS18, Europe’s premier conference on language in society
Sociolinguistics is about the relationship between language and society. Recorded in 2010, the conference explored the ways social structure is affected by verbal practices and the relationship between language and migration, and the role of cities to this relationship.

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The Story of Zahra and Beirut Blues: Hanan Al-Shaykh
Author Hanan Al-Shaykh talks about the Lebanese novel and her life as a writer; and reads extracts from her novel: the Story of Zahra and Beirut Blues.

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Thinking of studying BA Archaeology and History?
Student Joseph Lee talks about his experience of studying a combined degree in Archaeology and History at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying BA English?
Student Beth Stephens talks about her experience of studying an English programme at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying BA Film Studies?
Student Dom Kullander talks about his experience of studying Film Studies at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying BA Music?
Student Kat Hattersley talks about her experience of being President of Baby SUSO; a Student Union project that introduced orchestral music to Schools.

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Thinking of studying BSc German Linguistic Studies?
Student Alice Greenfield talks about her experience of studying a languages programme with a year abroad.

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Thinking of studying BSc Languages and Contemporary European Studies?
Student Ozge Ozogul talks about her experience of participating in the Erasmus exchange programme.

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Thinking of studying MA Jewish History & Culture?
Student Alex Cunningham talks about her experience of studying a postgraduate Humanities programme at Southampton, who specialise in Jewish History.

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Thinking of studying MA Music?
Emily Mould talks about about her experience of studying on the Postgraduate taught programme in Music at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying MA Philosophy?
Student Kelsey Miller talks about her experience of studying on the Postgraduate taught Philosophy programme at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying a Postgraduate Research programme in Archaeology?
Gareth Beal talks about his research area of archaeological computer graphics and the representation of three dimensional visualisations, including painted statuary; and his reasons for choosing Southampton.

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Thinking of studying a Postgraduate Research programme in English?
Denise Greenfield talks about her reasons for returning to study as a mature student, and for choosing to study a research programme in English at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying a Postgraduate Research programme in Film Studies?
Student Zubair Shafiq Jatoi talks about his reasons for choosing to study a research programme in Film Studies at Southampton.

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Thinking of studying a Postgraduate Research programme in Music?
George Holloway talks about his reasons for choosing to study a research programme in Music at Southampton.

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Winter graduation 2009
Listen to sound-clips from the Humanities winter graduation ceremony, recorded in 2009.

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Wonderful discoveries. The Portus Project revealed
Find out more about Portus, the Imperial Port of Rome. Discoveries have included statues and inscriptions of the ancient palace, and investigations have revealed aspects of the daily lives of the people who lived and worked there.

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This list was generated on Sun May 19 11:53:47 2019 BST.