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Number of items: 6.

Philosophy Café – Is it rational to be moral? By Dr Jonathan Way.
The University of Southampton’s popular Philosophy Cafe series has considered the differences between rationality and morality. Dr Jonathan Way has argued that we ordinarily assume that it is rational to be moral - that we are not foolish for doing what's right. However, on reflection it can be hard to see why this is so. After all, it certainly seems as if there can be occasions on which immorality pays. Nor is it obvious that immorality must involve any kind of inconsistency or confusion. His talk explored these challenges and considered how some philosophers have tried to vindicate the rationality of morality. For further information on the University of Southampton’s Philosophy Café’s visit http://www.southampton.ac.uk/lifelonglearning/philosophy/public_events/cafe.page?

Profile PictureSara Mailis
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Philosophy Café – What is the ‘Mind/Body Problem’? by Dr Genia Schonbaumsfeld
The philosopher Descartes famously held that the mind is an immaterial, thinking substance entirely distinct from the body. If he is right, it is hard to see how mind and body could ever interact - for how can something immaterial causally affect something physical? Most contemporary philosophers would reject this Cartesian dualism but the problem of what the mind is, and how it relates to the body, or brain, remains pressing today. Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, Dr Genia Schonbaumsfeld, discussed this issue at the University of Southampton's Philosophy Cafe at the John Hansard Gallery; an event organised by Lifelong Learning in Humanities. Philosophy Cafe talks are scheduled each month and cover a wide range of topics.

Profile PictureSara Mailis
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Philosophy Café. Jonathan Way - Ethics Without Principles?
Our highly successful Philosophy Café (run in conjunction with the John Hansard Gallery) is now entering its fifth year: the Café offers regular, informal lunchtime discussions that are free and accessible. These regular, informal lunchtime discussions are held between 1-2pm and open to all (no booking required). They aim to bring together those with an interest in philosophy - from both within the University and the wider local community.

Profile PictureSara Mailis
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Philosophy Café. Lee Walters - Is Time Travel Possible?
These regular, informal lunchtime discussions are held between 1-2pm and open to all (no booking required). They aim to bring together those with an interest in philosophy - from both within the University and the wider local community.

Profile PictureSara Mailis
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Relevance of biography to philosophical study
Professor Ray Monk discussed the relevance of biography to philosophical study with reference to Wittgenstein in the latest Philosophy Cafe at the John Hansard Gallery at the University of Southampton. Wittgenstein the philosopher has had a huge influence within philosophy and other academic disciplines. Outside academic life, Wittgenstein the man has inspired artists, poets, film-makers, novelists and dramatists to attempt to capture the fascination of his uniquely intense and austere personality. Ray, who has written a biography of the philosopher and the man attracted a large audience keen to find out more:

Profile PictureKerry Small
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Tolstoy’s Contagion Theory of Art
Just as the food we ought to consume is not necessarily the tastiest, so the art we ought to value is not necessarily that which pleases most. So what kind of art truly nourishes the soul? This talk will explore Tolstoy’s answer –that it is the kind of art in which the audience contracts the feelings of the artist like a contagion, thereby forming moral bonds between individuals and within communities.

Profile PictureStephan Caspar
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This list was generated on Thu Sep 19 23:19:01 2019 BST.