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Number of items: 13.

Dr Bharat Tandon’s talk: I do not write for such dull Elves: Finding Voices in Pride and Prejudice
Four scholars of Austen discussed her best-loved novel, with a variety of talks focusing on her style, on reception and legacy, on her life and times, and on 20th and 21st century adaptations. Dr Shelley Cobb, Lecturer of English and Film at the University of Southampton, spoke about how Pride and Prejudice had been portrayed on film and TV, from conventional treatments to the adoption of its themes in Bridget Jones Diary; her talk included amusing and illuminating video clips. The day was organised by Dr Gillian Dow, Director of Research at Chawton House Library and Southampton lecturer. It ended at Jane Austen's House Museum, with a selection of readings from the novel by Elizabeth Garvie, the actress who played Elizabeth Bennet in the 1980 BBC production of Pride and Prejudice. Dr Bharat Tandon from the University of East Anglia, is the author of Jane Austen and the Morality of Conversation (2003) and a judge for the 2012 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. He was one of the speakers at the study day. Listen to his talk: I do not write for such dull Elves: Finding Voices in Pride and Prejudice.

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And 3 more...
Examining the future of Holocaust studies
Almost 70 years after the liberation of the concentration camps, the future of Holocaust studies has been discussed at a unique conference at the Universities of Southampton and Winchester, organised by the Parkes Institute for Jewish/non-Jewish Relations. Uniquely, it featured talks by around 60 academic researchers from countries including Israel, the USA and China, museum professionals and 40 teachers from the south of England. Topics covered included the role of interactive story-telling in Holocaust education, children’s memories and treatments of genocide stories in popular film and television.

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PG Health Lecture - Professor Don Nutbeam
Lecture delivered by Professor Don Nutbeam, Vice Chancellor, University of Southampton. "The Impact of Schools on Health".

Profile PictureKerry Small
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Philosophy Cafe podcast: Are people always selfish?
The latest in the popular Philosophy cafe series at the John Hansard Gallery saw Dr Alex Gregory talking about self interest. Alex researches the relationship between what we want and what we think is good, and has published on these issues. "It's clear that people sometimes do things for their own benefit: you might push ahead of other people to ensure you get a good seat on the train. Some philosophers have made the bolder claim that we always act out of self-interest. But is that true? What are the arguments for it? It might seem obvious that sometimes people act for the sake of others: for example, someone might offer to donate blood for the benefit of a complete stranger. But can such examples be explained away as ultimately self-interested?".

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Philosophy Café – How much must we give to famine relief?
Every day many people die from lack of food. It is in our power to prevent a large number of these deaths. Philosophers such as Peter Singer and Peter Unger have argued that, given these facts, a typical member of an affluent country is morally required to give away most of their assets to famine relief. But does morality really demand that we sacrifice so much to save the lives of strangers? Philosophy Cafe talks are scheduled each month and cover a wide range of topics, for more information on future Philosophy Cafes please visit the Philosophy website.

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Philosophy Café – What am I? by Dr Conor McHugh
Lecturer Dr Conor McHugh challenged the audience at the University of Southampton Philosophy Cafe to consider what makes a person. He asked them to ponder what would happen if scientists swapped individual’s brains from one person to another: “Which, if either, of the resulting people is you? What if the scientists erase all of my memories and scan them into your brain? In that case, it will seem to you that it was you who, for example, wrote these words. Is this impression illusory?” Conor’s lively session, encouraging people to think about such questions, was aimed at helping us to get clearer on personal identity and on our concern for our own futures.

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Philosophy Café – What is the ‘Mind/Body Problem’? by Dr Genia Schonbaumsfeld
The philosopher Descartes famously held that the mind is an immaterial, thinking substance entirely distinct from the body. If he is right, it is hard to see how mind and body could ever interact - for how can something immaterial causally affect something physical? Most contemporary philosophers would reject this Cartesian dualism but the problem of what the mind is, and how it relates to the body, or brain, remains pressing today. Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, Dr Genia Schonbaumsfeld, discussed this issue at the University of Southampton's Philosophy Cafe at the John Hansard Gallery; an event organised by Lifelong Learning in Humanities. Philosophy Cafe talks are scheduled each month and cover a wide range of topics.

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Philosophy Café – What’s so good about free thinking? By Dr Sasha Mudd.
The notion of ‘free thought' is fundamental to many of our deeply cherished liberal ideals. Universities, books, and people are often celebrated (or feared) for their power to encourage it, and many liberal institutions exist to protect it. However, it is surprisingly difficult to say what free thought is, and why it's worth having. Lecturer Dr Sasha Mudd explored the meaning and significance of ‘free thought' in a popular Philosophy Cafe session at the John Hansard Gallery on campus. She drew on insights from two of its greatest champions: Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill.

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Relevance of biography to philosophical study
Professor Ray Monk discussed the relevance of biography to philosophical study with reference to Wittgenstein in the latest Philosophy Cafe at the John Hansard Gallery at the University of Southampton. Wittgenstein the philosopher has had a huge influence within philosophy and other academic disciplines. Outside academic life, Wittgenstein the man has inspired artists, poets, film-makers, novelists and dramatists to attempt to capture the fascination of his uniquely intense and austere personality. Ray, who has written a biography of the philosopher and the man attracted a large audience keen to find out more:

Profile PictureKerry Small
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Telling Our Stories: In Conversation Episode 1
Dr Cheryl Metcalf from Health Sciences talks to Professor Graeme Earl from Archaeology, revealing some unexpected connections between their work.

Profile PictureGeorgina Miller
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Telling Our Stories: In Conversation Episode 2
Dr Cheryl Metcalf from Health Sciences talks to Dr Richard Polfreman from Music, revealing some unexpected connections between their work.

Profile PictureGeorgina Miller
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Telling Our Stories: In Conversation Episode 3
Professor Graeme Earle from Archaeology talks to Professor Roxana Carare from Medicine, revealing some unexpected connections between their work.

Profile PictureGeorgina Miller
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Telling Our Stories: In Conversation Episode 4
Professor Roxana Carare from Medicine talks to Professor Neil Bressloff from Engineering, revealing some unexpected connections between their work.

Profile PictureGeorgina Miller
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This list was generated on Sun Jul 21 22:53:55 2019 BST.